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September-October 2015

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In This Issue

"Moonshot"

"Moonshot"

"Moonshot" is a new collection of 13 stories by Indigenous comics. Many of the authors' names in the book will be familiar to our readers, including those of Arigon Starr and Buffy Sainte-Marie.

A True Houma-Made Meal

A True Houma-Made Meal

Lora Ann Chaisson (Houma), a tribal leader from the Gulf Coast, prepares a Houma-made gumbo dish with a side helping of Louisiana's Indigenous culture and history.

Native Peoples welcomes Loretta Barrett Oden as new food columnist

Native Peoples welcomes Loretta Barrett Oden as new food columnist

As chef/owner of the Corn Dance Café in Santa Fe, New Mexico, Oden (Potawatomi) was among the first restaurateurs to showcase Indigenous foods of the Americas. She has appeared often as a guest on national television programs and written and hosted her own Emmy Award–winning five-part PBS series, Seasoned with Spirit: A Native Cook’s Journey.

'Native Haute Couture'

'Native Haute Couture'

Patricia Michaels (Taos Pueblo) plans to unveil new pieces at a fashion show hosted by the Mitchell Museum of the American Indian in Chicago.

Natural Beauty

Natural Beauty

From the Hopi to the Hawaiians, Indigenous peoples in the United States derive beauty and health secrets from the gifts of their homelands.

'Good Handed'

'Good Handed'

When she was 12, an elder gave ceramic artist Karita Coffey (Commanche) the name Tsat-Tah Mo-oh Kahn, or Good-Handed. "You could almost say it was destiny," she says. Coffey leaves the Institute of American Indian Arts to focus on her craft after 25 years of teaching.

Lakota Youth Skate for Life

Lakota Youth Skate for Life

As more and more skate parks spring up in tribal communities nationwide, youth like 15-year-old Emily Earring (Lakota) say skateboarding has become their shield as they navigate the rough terrain of what it is to be a Native teenager.

Tribal Sustainability Movements

Tribal Sustainability Movements

Two Indigenous women - Karen Ducheneaux (Lakota) from a reservation in South Dakota and Monycka Snowbird (Ojibwe) from urban Colorado Springs - are leading sustainability movements in their communities.

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